DevHints

Check Your Myspace Mail Via Cellphone

Posted on: November 15, 2006

I’m currently about half-way finished with a project that allows a user to check their Myspace Mail inbox through WML and WAP (mobile internet standards). The user simply visits this service, dubbed mBridge at the moment, on their mobile phone. They will be prompted for their Myspace login information. mBridge will pass the credentials on to Myspace and retrieve the 10 most recent messages, strip any code, and display them for the user to read. For those of you interested in how this works, read on.

First, mBridge has a login page written in WML that includes a form allowing the user to type their email and password for Myspace. After the user submits this information, mBridge will take it and use it to connect to Myspace via sockets. A socket is opened to myspace.com, headers for the homepage are written, and a token is retrieved. mBridge then opens a socket to login.myspace.com and uses a POST request to send the user credentials. After a few redirects and setting of cookies, we have a valid session with Myspace. mBridge retrieves the mail center page and uses a regex to grab the dates on all of the messages, their subjects, and the message ids of all of them. Now we open a socket for each message found in the inbox and retrieve the content.

The subject lines are stripped of repetitive “RE:” flags and the messages are stripped of code that won’t display properly in a mobile browser. The user is sent a list of links to each of the messages for them to read. When they read a message, they have a link to respond to the message.

When a message is sent, we log back in, visit the mail center, read the message, simulate a click on the reply button, and insert the mobile users response in the field before clicking send.

Will Myspace try to stop this from happening? While it’s possible that they will change the login method, links, or method for sending message, we can always adapt to it. If your browser can login, so can a script. It is also possible that they will incorporate JavaScript into the service to set cookies that we would otherwise miss with a script, but we can always determine the behavior of the script and make it work no problem. It is possible for Myspace to start blocking our IP address, but we can go buy more. Myspace can force users to verify a CAPTCHA before logging in, but we will develop OCR that can answer them just as accurately as a human, or pass them on to the mobile user and allow them to answer them.

The only thing Myspace might do is try to shut us down through legal methods. I’m not aware of anything illegal about what mBridge does, though I’m not a lawyer. I’d hope that since Myspace does not have a service competing with this they won’t get their panties in a bunch that their customers don’t have to login to something they made to get their messages, but really, can they continue to expect people to put up with a lack of updates, no integration with mobile phones, and constant errors?

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